How to Grow Your Own

 

We all know that feeling – it’s 4pm in the afternoon, and we don’t really feel like facing the masses at the grocery store, but don’t have anything in the fridge for dinner – what to do? What if we could just step into our back yard and pick dinner? The majority of us are not farmers, urban farmers, or even gardeners, but that doesn’t mean we can’t keep a couple useful things alive. Here are a couple tips for how you can grow your own.

 

  1. So you don’t want to grow plants from seed, we get it. Most grocery stores have that lovely little spot right out front with plants on little plastic shelves? Next time you’re there, check them out. This is a great spot to pick up some fresh herbs in a little pot like basil, parsley, cilantro, and rosemary. Then you can just sit that pot on your back porch or window sill – et voila! herbs to order.
  2. Feeling more adventurous? At many grocery stores, you’ll also find seed packets (you could also order some online). Pick out a couple of simple seeds based on the space you have. For small spaces,  lettuce, basil, parsley, or mint will do well. For a larger growing space, try squash, cucumbers, and beans. Make sure you’ve got a pot ready at home, and then place the seeds in soil according to the directions on the back of the packet. Water daily, and soon you’ll have a little something delicious sprouting!
  3. Starting late in the season, and don’t have the time to grow from seed? No problem! Find a local farm and give them a call. Most farms will have extra transplants, which are the plants they started from seed and will eventually put in their fields. You can usually get some kale, collards, tomatoes, and herbs that the farm doesn’t need. These can go directly into a pot, window box, or raised bed.
  4. Want to start a serious backyard garden? Look around for a local garden or agriculture club, or check back in with that local farm to see if they’re holding classes. You can even see if there’s a non profit in your area that can help you build some beds and start some seeds in your back (or front) yard.
  5. Want to grow, but not in your yard? In most cities around the country you can find community gardens. Spaces where you can rent a raised bed, and grow a season of vegetables. You can even share tasks with other members, which will make a bigger harvest bounty for all of you!

We are unveiling our new Community Garden at Hope Farms this fall. Email info@recipe4success.org if you are interested in reserving a raised bed to grow your own delicious veggies!

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